Implementing Two-Factor Authentication In DSARs And Beyond

Implementing Two-Factor Authentication In DSARs And Beyond

Strong password practices are essential for keeping your company’s and users’ data safe, in processing DSARs and in your general business practices. However, passwords are just one part of the equation. For next-level protection, here’s the 411 on 2FA: two-factor authentication. The Basics of Two-Factor Authentication Two-factor authentication, sometimes called multi-factor authentication, is exactly what it sounds like. It is a two-step process to verify that someone is who they say they are. In addition to a password, two-factor authentication requires additional information from the user. For instance, a user might have a unique code sent to their email or to an app on their phone. The user then inputs this code as part of the log-in process. Two-factor authentication …

Global Comparison Of DSARs And Data Subject Requests

Global Comparison Of DSARs And Data Subject Requests

Data subject access requests (DSARs) and data subject requests (DSRs) are among the most prominent user-facing aspects of modern privacy regulations. Effectively fulfilling users’ requests in accordance with global regulations is one of the most visible ways you can earn users’ trust. Defining DSARs and DSRs DSARs and DSRs are related terms, sometimes used interchangeably, to describe requests that end-users can make regarding their privacy rights. DSRs refer to users’ requests to access, erase, or correct their data according to the relevant regulation, such as the EU’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). DSARs specifically refer to access requests. In other words, DSRs form an umbrella category that includes DSARs as well as other requests. This article is a guide on …

Why Data Erasure Actually Might Not Leave A Blank Cell

Why Data Erasure Actually Might Not Leave A Blank Cell

Erasure requests are a key component of privacy regulations worldwide. To meet the growing requirements, teams must be able to effectively erase a requesting user’s data. That erasure actually might not leave a blank cell in the database, and that’s a good thing. Data Erasure, Explained The EU’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) has set the global standard for privacy, including in the rights it grants to users. Among them, a right to erasure: a user can request that a company remove all personal data they hold on them. In recent years, this right to erasure – sometimes called “right to delete” or “right to be forgotten” – has cropped up in privacy regulations worldwide, from Virginia’s CDPA to Brazil’s …