What Businesses Can Learn From WhatsApp’s Privacy Policy Uproar

What Businesses Can Learn From WhatsApp’s Privacy Policy Uproar

In the few short days since its unveiling, WhatsApp’s updated Privacy Policy has provoked widespread backlash, including a request from the Indian government to withdraw the changes entirely. In short, the change describes how users’ data – including device type, general location, and language – would be shared with Facebook, which acquired WhatsApp back in 2014 and appears keen to use the platform for future data-driven e-commerce initiatives. A handful of in-depth recaps explain the changes in greater detail, like this overview from Gizmodo. However, one of the most concerning impacts of this development is not so much a particular policy change but rather the trend it illustrates: for users in the United States and other countries lacking strong privacy …

A CPRA Note from our CEO

A CPRA Note from our CEO

What a year 2020 has been, for the world at large and for the field of data privacy specifically.  US businesses that previously hadn’t thought too hard about the ways they collect and process data will have found the last 10 months felt somewhere between “whirlwind” and “tornado”. There was the introduction of the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) on January 1st. Then, around mid-March, global lockdown, work from home, and a million little disruptions to data management practices. In summer, EU-US data flows were thrown into chaos.  And finally this morning, Californians and businesses at large wake up to the passage of Proposition 24, the California Privacy Rights Act. It’s a brand new privacy law less than a year …

The Story Behind CPRA: Less Than a Year After the Introduction of the CCPA, Why is California Voting on Another Privacy Law?

The Story Behind CPRA: Less Than a Year After the Introduction of the CCPA, Why is California Voting on Another Privacy Law?

Back in 2018, California lawmakers hurried to pass the CCPA, a new regulation about privacy and data compliance. This year, Californian voters faced another privacy-related choice on the ballot. So, why is there a new law on the table so soon after implementation of a similar one? The story behind California’s new data privacy law is about human optimism, philosophical battles over the right to privacy, tech companies determined to operate within grey areas, and of course, plenty of confusing acronyms.  On November 3rd, 2020, California voters decided to vote CPRA into law. It will go into effect in January 2023 (with a lookback provision starting in 2022) and have major data compliance implications for all companies that do business …